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Military

Flying a Steerman

 

Stearman Aircraft Corporation was an aircraft manufacturer in Wichita, Kansas. In 1934 the aircraft manufacturer became a subsidiary of Boeing. Although the Stearman Aircraft produced a range aircraft, it is most known for designing the Model 75, commonly known as the “Stearman” or “Boeing Stearman”. The Stearman (Boeing) Model 75 is a biplane that was used as a military trainer aircraft. At least 9,783 were built in the United States during the 1930s and 1940s. The sound of the Stearman plane stands out from similar aircraft and is considered something of a trademark. Post war the Stearman was used as a crop duster and a sport plane. Today many hundred Stearmans are flown by private owners.

Photo from a 1948 Boeing Stearman biplane in Kissimee, FL

View from the cockpit

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Nanchang CJ-6 Dives Deep & Rolls Over

Introduced in 1960 the Nanchang CJ-6 is a two seat primary trainer aircraft, powered by a 260-hp Zhuzhou Huosai HS-6 radial piston engine.  A common, but mistaken, belief is that the CJ-6 is a Chinese version of the Yakovlev Yak-18A. The CJ-6A, an improved 285 horse version, is a popular hobby plane. A CJ-6 can cost as little as $75,000 in the US resale market. The aircraft appears on the civil register of the USA, Australia, UK, South Africa and other countries.

Nanchang CJ-6, Deep Dive
Rolling Over LA
Nanchang CJ-6 Over the Pacific


Eye Of The Tiger

The de Havilland DH 82 Tiger Moth is a 1930s biplane designed by Geoffrey de Havilland and was operated by the Royal Air Force between the 30s and early 50s. From the 30s till today this aircraft is occasionally used as a primary trainer. Tiger Moths still remain in widespread use as a recreational aircraft in many countries.


B-17 Flying Fortress

The B-17 Flying Fortress was a high-flying, powerful bomber that was able to defend itself, and return home from long range missions despite extensive battle damage. The B-17 had a greater service ceiling than similar aircraft of its time. The B-17 proved itself as an effective weapons system, dropping more bombs than any other U.S. aircraft in World War II.

B-17 Flying Fortress "Aluminum Overcast"


Air National Guard

C-17, Globemaster III

F-16's Flying High above the Clouds